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I have a PC with 1.5 GB ram, running the live USB version of ubuntu 10.10 (using pendrivelinux USB installer and no persistant file storage) Why does the aufs filesystem ...
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  1. #1
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    why was my aufs filesystem get configured so small?


    I have a PC with 1.5 GB ram, running the live USB version of ubuntu 10.10 (using pendrivelinux USB installer and no persistant file storage)
    Why does the aufs filesystem fill up even when there is plenty of unused RAM? How can I expand the ram available to aufs?

    # free
    total used free shared buffers cached
    Mem: 1541536 1421432 120104 0 62784 1047284
    -/+ buffers/cache: 311364 1230172
    Swap: 0 0 0

    # df -v
    Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
    aufs 770768 770768 0 100% /
    none 764852 228 764624 1% /dev
    /dev/sda1 4076212 709708 3366504 18% /cdrom
    /dev/loop0 676480 676480 0 100% /rofs
    none 770768 1832 768936 1% /dev/shm
    tmpfs 770768 60 770708 1% /tmp
    none 770768 124 770644 1% /var/run
    none 770768 0 770768 0% /var/lock

  2. #2
    Linux User sgosnell's Avatar
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    Aufs and RAM are different. Aufs is the filesystem on the USB drive.

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    I know but if I have so much spare RAM, the aufs filesystem should not run out of space so quickly, right? Per the df command it's full and I can't write files to it.

  4. #4
    Linux User sgosnell's Avatar
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    Again, RAM has nothing to do with storage. You said the liveUSB drive is non-persistent, which means the aufs was built to the exact size needed, and you can't write anything to it. That's why it's at 100%, and always will be. You need to read up on the difference between RAM and storage memory, and if you want to save files to the drive, make it persistent. You'll need to reinstall the OS from scratch to do that.

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  6. #6
    Linux User sgosnell's Avatar
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    But that won't allow saving files, at least not permanently. The ramdisk is wiped on reboot. If he wants to save files, he needs to install with persistent storage space.

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    How will creating a ramdisk help? I needed to increase the size of the aufs filesystem which was full for some reason.

    In the previous example the aufs filesystem hit 100% after I used apt-get to install some packages.

    Then I simply rebooted and it's only at 54% usage and I can write to it:

    # free
    total used free shared buffers cached
    Mem: 1541536 1177660 363876 0 120168 853056
    -/+ buffers/cache: 204436 1337100
    Swap: 0 0 0

    # df
    Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
    aufs 770768 410416 360352 54% /
    none 764852 228 764624 1% /dev
    /dev/sda1 4076212 709708 3366504 18% /cdrom
    /dev/loop0 676480 676480 0 100% /rofs
    none 770768 188 770580 1% /dev/shm
    tmpfs 770768 12 770756 1% /tmp
    none 770768 96 770672 1% /var/run
    none 770768 0 770768 0% /var/lock

  8. #8
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    using pendrivelinux USB installer and no persistant file storage
    OP is aware he does not have persistent storage and wants to use RAM - hence is misunderstanding of aufs. I believe he wants to just download/save some files while the OS is active. Just a "best guess" at the OP's intentions.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by redss View Post
    How will creating a ramdisk help? I needed to increase the size of the aufs filesystem which was full for some reason.

    In the previous example the aufs filesystem hit 100% after I used apt-get to install some packages.

    Then I simply rebooted and it's only at 54% usage and I can write to it:

    # free
    total used free shared buffers cached
    Mem: 1541536 1177660 363876 0 120168 853056
    -/+ buffers/cache: 204436 1337100
    Swap: 0 0 0

    # df
    Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
    aufs 770768 410416 360352 54% /
    none 764852 228 764624 1% /dev
    /dev/sda1 4076212 709708 3366504 18% /cdrom
    /dev/loop0 676480 676480 0 100% /rofs
    none 770768 188 770580 1% /dev/shm
    tmpfs 770768 12 770756 1% /tmp
    none 770768 96 770672 1% /var/run
    none 770768 0 770768 0% /var/lock
    If you are installing apps via apt-get on a Live distro and those apps are too large for the default filesystem, you'll need to re-author the Live distro. I would not recommend that process to the inexperienced. You may possibly be able to add some persistent storage to the distro, such as on a USB stick and redirect apt-get's temp space to that storage. There is not enough info to determine what is filling all the space - downloaded files and/or the installed apps.

  10. #10
    Linux User sgosnell's Avatar
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    If you really want to install packages, and save data, don't use a liveUSB, do a full install to a relatively large USB drive. 16GB is about the right size. Use a small, ~1GB drive to hold the liveUSB, boot from that, and then install to the larger USB drive. This will give you a standard Linux installation on a USB drive. On a liveUSB with persistence, you'll eventually fill it up, sooner rather than later, even if it's large. LiveUSB disks are for trying out a distro to see if you like it, not for long-term use.

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