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Hi Everybody! I finally had enough with Windows and I decided to buy a System76 Gazelle Professional to replace my dead Dell Latitude D630. I want to purchase 16GB of ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! JohnSmithNot1882's Avatar
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    Question Is 1600MHz ram significantly faster than 1333MHz ram?


    Hi Everybody!

    I finally had enough with Windows and I decided to buy a System76 Gazelle Professional to replace my dead Dell Latitude D630. I want to purchase 16GB of ram so I do not have to worry about upgrading it later, but I am not sure if Ubuntu 11.10 64-bit can utilize 16GB of ram. Can Ubuntu 11.10 64-bit utilize 16GB of ram? Upgrading 16GB from 1333MHz-1600MHz is $70. Is the upgrade from 1333-1600MHz going to make a noticeable difference? Is the upgrade worth $70?

    Thank you for your help

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    This is always a difficult question to answer. Ubuntu should recognise and operate with the extra memory, so that's not really a problem.

    The speed of your RAM is one of the bottlenecks of the system, it's much slower than your CPU's on-chip cache, but in turn is much quicker than hard disk or SSD storage. In theory, it should be 266MHz (about 20% of your original 1333MHz) faster, but if you are not using your system to its max, if you're not straining every last ounce of performance out of it, you'll probably never notice.

    If you play a lot of games, or if you do heavyweight tasks like video, audio or photo processing, or if you're into raytracing, you might notice the speed improvements. If all you do is browse a few web pages and do a bit of word processing or spreadsheeting, then you probably won't see anything.

    Most people use the bleeding edge to play games - the best thing you can do is save yourself the $70 until you've tried out the games that you want to play. If it turns out that you can't get the framerate or detail level out of the game that you desire, then it is time to spend the money.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  3. #3
    Linux User hatebreed's Avatar
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    One thing I would like to add. If you are planning on playing games then windows is your best bet. I love linux but the problem is that wine just isn't there yet for most games. Although some games work fine, others may work with some tweaking, and yet others just will not work at all. Even if you are a gamer the speed of your memory isn't going to be a huge deal because the majority of your processing is done by your video card not your cpu and ram. The only time you are going to use your system resources to a great effect is when your resolution is below 1280x768. But I agree with roxoff, I would play some games and see if you are getting the frame rate you are looking for. Just be aware of the fact that the most important thing in gaming is your video card and if things are slow then it would be a good idea to upgrade the video card first.

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  5. #4
    Just Joined! JohnSmithNot1882's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hatebreed View Post
    One thing I would like to add. If you are planning on playing games then windows is your best bet. I love linux but the problem is that wine just isn't there yet for most games. Although some games work fine, others may work with some tweaking, and yet others just will not work at all. Even if you are a gamer the speed of your memory isn't going to be a huge deal because the majority of your processing is done by your video card not your cpu and ram. The only time you are going to use your system resources to a great effect is when your resolution is below 1280x768. But I agree with roxoff, I would play some games and see if you are getting the frame rate you are looking for. Just be aware of the fact that the most important thing in gaming is your video card and if things are slow then it would be a good idea to upgrade the video card first.
    My opinion of WINE is not going to earn me many friends on this site. It sucks. I am buying a Ubuntu computer to run Ubuntu only. I am aware Ubuntu has a tiny selection of games and I will not be able to play Diablo III . One nice feature of the Gazelle Professional is its Geforce GTX 560M (1.5 GB 192-bit bus) video card. I am not sure what I will use it for yet, maybe I will learn video editing. Thanks for all of your responses. Your responses along with the Ubuntu forum and online Google searches all agree upgrading my ram from 1333MHz to 1600MHz will not improve my laptop's performance for what I need. I will buy a laptop with 16GB 1333Mhz ram.
    ptkobe likes this.

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