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I have installed Windows first and then Ubuntu. For ubuntu I have created a Swap, home and / partitions. This is what fdisk -l shows Device Boot Start End Blocks ...
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  1. #1
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    Understanding my partitions


    I have installed Windows first and then Ubuntu. For ubuntu I have created a Swap, home and / partitions.
    This is what fdisk -l shows
    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 2048 206847 102400 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
    /dev/sda2 206848 104036351 51914752 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
    /dev/sda3 104038398 451690495 173826049 5 Extended
    /dev/sda5 104038400 143097855 19529728 83 Linux
    /dev/sda6 143099904 436066303 146483200 83 Linux
    /dev/sda7 436068352 451690495 7811072 82 Linux swap / Solaris


    I just want to be sure that I have done it correctly so if I install a newer version my home directory etc will be left alone. One time I attempted an inplace upgrade and the upgrade went awry but due to my not having partitioned properly the reinstall wiped out everything and I don't want a recurrence.

    Would you be able to confirm this for me?

  2. #2
    Blackfooted Penguin daark.child's Avatar
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    Hi and welcome to the forum.

    From what you have said and the output you posted, you should be able to upgrade to or install newer versions without affecting your personal data. Just make sure that when installing from scratch (if you ever want to do a clean install or install a new version of Linux), not to format /home because this is where your personal data is stored.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by daark.child View Post
    Hi and welcome to the forum.

    From what you have said and the output you posted, you should be able to upgrade to or install newer versions without affecting your personal data. Just make sure that when installing from scratch (if you ever want to do a clean install or install a new version of Linux), not to format /home because this is where your personal data is stored.
    Thank you for confirming it.
    One futher question- how about applications and programs I've installed? Are they also in my /home? Since I use the synaptic or Ubuntu Software center I have no idea where the executables and dll's and so on are located.
    In other words, what is the Linux equivalent of C:\Program Files?

  4. #4
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Hi there.
    Most likely, if you do an upgrade, your applications should stay intact.
    Keywords there... Most likely and should. But things can happen.
    Installed software is typically stored in either /bin or /sbin, with configurations in /home or sometimes /etc.
    Jay

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  5. #5
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    The partitioning schema looks sensible. Now get yourself an equally sensible backup regimen. One day you will regret not having one

    Software on Linux is typically not in a central place. The usual suspects are /bin /sbin /usr/bin /usr/sbin /usr/local/bin /usr/local/sbin and sometimes even /opt with system wide configuration held in /etc and user specific configs in the users home directory (phew).

    There is an easy way to get a list of installed software and then re-apply it to a clean install however.

    Store a list of installed software
    Code:
    dpkg --get-selections > installed-software
    Prepare to install from a list of software
    Code:
    dpkg --set-selections < installed-software
    Install the list
    Code:
    dselect
    And here is an excellent introduction to the Linux directory structure.
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


    The Fifth Continent

  6. #6
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    Thank you Jay and Elija.
    So if I understand correctly, an upgrade of the OS will leave the apps alone for the most part. If things go pearshaped and I end up having to wipe out the / partition and reinstall (I had to do it once, hence my what-if scenario) I'll have to reinstall the progams.
    But Ubuntu/Liinux makes it much easier due to package managers- I will use that dpkg command to facilitate this.

    I was explaining to a co-worker (who's exclusively Windows-literate) the concept of installing programs via package manager and it was hard going till I realised that the new crop of portable s/w utitilies serve almost exactly this purpose. I'm a fan of Liberkey myself, can't sing its praises enough!

    And yes- backups! Nice use of "regimen"!

    I'll definitely read that FIleSystem article some time this weekend.

    Rgds

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