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Can someone quickly review the partition plan below for dual booting Kubuntu and OracleLinux? Any suggestions highly appreciated. Many thanks for your time and attention. /dev/sda (225GB) +-/dev/sda1 /boot (500MB, ...
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  1. #1
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    Partition plan for dual booting only Linux Distros.


    Can someone quickly review the partition plan below for dual booting Kubuntu and OracleLinux? Any suggestions highly appreciated.

    Many thanks for your time and attention.

    /dev/sda (225GB)
    +-/dev/sda1 /boot (500MB, ext2) Kubuntu11.10
    +-/dev/sda2 data (100GB, ext4) Shared (non OS files)
    +-/dev/sda3 swap (3GB, ext3) Shared
    +-/dev/sda4 extended (120GB, ext4)
    +-/dev/sda5 /tmp (2GB, ext4) Kubuntu11.10
    +-/dev/sda6 /home (15GB, ext4) Kubuntu11.10
    +-/dev/sda7 / (20GB, ext4) Kubuntu 11.10
    +-/dev/sda8 /boot (500MB, ext4) OEL6.2
    +-/dev/sda9 /tmp (2GB, ext4) OEL6.2
    +-/dev/sda10 /home (10GB, ext4) OEL6.2
    +-/dev/sda11 / (15GB, ext4) OEL6.2
    +-/dev/sda12 /oracle (20GB, ext4) Oracle11gR2 + datafiles + tools

    Free Space = 15GB

  2. #2
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
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    Hello and Welcome.
    The only thing I might change would be to delete one /home partition and use the remaining /home partition to share between the two distros. Just use different usernames on each distro.
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help, Please keep it on the forums only.
    All new users please read this.** Forum FAQS. ** Adopt an unanswered post.

    I'd rather be lost at the lake than found at home.

  3. #3
    oz
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    Hello and welcome to the forums!

    In addition to what MikeTbob said above, you could probably reduce the size of the /boot partitions to about 100 MB unless you have some reason for needing them to be so large.
    oz

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    Thank you very much Mike and Oz. Your comments really make sense.

    The discussion with one of my friends lead me to reconsider unnecessary partitioning and here is my new plan:

    1 primary partition for Kubuntu (20 GB)
    1 primary partition for OL 6.2 (20 GB)
    1 primary partition for swap Kubuntu/OL 6.2 ( 5 GB )
    1 extended partition (ext3) for Oracle db files and FRA (30 GB)
    1 extended partition for a shared disk (100 GB) DATA (non OS)
    50GB free

    No /boot and /tmp partitions.

    The only thing is I already have 100GB "data" partition (non OS files) as a primary partition that is 75% filled up. So I am planning to create SWAP inside extended partition instead of as a primary so I will have 3 primary + 1 extended. Or may be during installation of first OS (Kubuntu) I will boot into LiveCD mode and try to move "data" partition into extended and delete the primary one later. Not sure if that can be done, else will go as mentioned above (SWAP inside extended).

    I just want to make sure I am on a right path before proceeding hence asking for opinions from the experts that played a lot with these things

    Thanks again for your attention.

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    Quote Originally Posted by buntush View Post
    Thank you very much Mike and Oz. Your comments really make sense.

    The discussion with one of my friends lead me to reconsider unnecessary partitioning and here is my new plan:

    1 primary partition for Kubuntu (20 GB)
    1 primary partition for OL 6.2 (20 GB)
    1 primary partition for swap Kubuntu/OL 6.2 ( 5 GB )
    1 extended partition (ext3) for Oracle db files and FRA (30 GB)
    1 extended partition for a shared disk (100 GB) DATA (non OS)
    50GB free

    No /boot and /tmp partitions.

    Thanks again for your attention.
    Having had one occasion where things went a bit wrong, I like to keep my /boot partition separate and either not mount it at all duing normal working or mount it read-only. That stops any stupidity on my part from trashing /boot (I managed to do that once with a typo in an archiving script and it was a pain to re-constitute things from a Live-CD). I only mount /boot read-write when doing kernel upgrades

  6. #6
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    A few thoughts.
    I like to have one /home partition for all distros. Makes backing-up easier.
    I've probably changed my partitions on my two hd's at least 30 times (I like to play with distros.) and thus I use the parted magic live cd to do all my re-partitioning. I trust it more than any other distro's constantly rebuilt installation pgms.
    Other than the above, you're last list of partitions seems as good as almost any.
    Best of luck.

  7. #7
    Just Joined! fenario's Avatar
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    Hi
    I like to keep cutting up and resizing partitions.
    But it's good to think a bit before the big move. to shrink or resize can take a very long time; hours!
    I would have each distro in a primary and keep your data/non-OS files in the primary (sda1?) and have sda4 as an extended partition to include: swap partition, the db files partition and then keep the free space inside this partition; you can only have 4 partitions all together, but up to sda15 in total, the rest sda5 to sda15 being inside sda4.

    and yes, we can trust in parted magic

    good luck
    fen

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