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i added a command on startup to mount a partition. now i deleted the partition and deleted the command from the startup applications, however, when i boot into ubuntu, it ...
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  1. #1
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    startup command still ran on startup after removal


    i added a command on startup to mount a partition. now i deleted the partition and deleted the command from the startup applications, however, when i boot into ubuntu, it takes a while and then i get an error saying the partition (the one i had mounted on startup before i removed it) didnt exist and couldnt be mounted.

    so in short:
    - i added a command to mount partition X in startup applications
    - i remove the command from startup applications
    - i deleted the partition
    - ubuntu still tries to mount the partition (that no longer exists) at startup, giving me an error and the option skip or manually mount

    i used the same user account when performing any of those actions (i didnt use sudo to remove the command from startup applications, but i didnt use sudo to add it either). im thinking there might still be a file in some place that is run on startup.

    any help appreciated, thanks

  2. #2
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    I can't remember for sure where certain startup files are stored in Ubuntu, but I can look around for that.

    Concerning the attempted partition mounting, could you post the output of:
    Code:
    sudo fdisk -l
    Code:
    cat /etc/fstab
    Jay

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  3. #3
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    fdisk
    Code:
    Disk /dev/sda: 250.1 GB, 250059350016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders, total 488397168 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x0001f577
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1            2048   215042047   107520000   83  Linux
    /dev/sda2   *   215046090   484199099   134576505    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
    /dev/sda3       484200446   488396799     2098177    5  Extended
    /dev/sda5       484200448   488396799     2098176   82  Linux swap / Solaris
    cat
    Code:
    # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
    #
    # Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a
    # device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices
    # that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
    #
    # <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
    proc            /proc           proc    nodev,noexec,nosuid 0       0
    # / was on /dev/sda1 during installation
    UUID=9a14ee1f-21cf-434a-8678-6c90cfe44612 /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
    # swap was on /dev/sda5 during installation
    UUID=dbae4db7-3829-40bf-96b2-3b648d233e0d none            swap    sw              0       0
    /dev/sda3	/mnt/Files	ext4	rw, owner, noauto, exec, nodev	0	0
    /dev/sdb        /media/floppy0  auto    rw,user,noauto,exec,utf8 0       0

  4. #4
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Can you also post the output of
    Code:
    cat /etc/mtab
    please?
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


    The Fifth Continent

  5. #5
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by saume View Post
    - ubuntu still tries to mount the partition (that no longer exists) at startup, giving me an error and the option skip or manually mount
    What partition was it?
    Jay

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    New Member FAQ
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  6. #6
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    cat /etc/mtab
    Code:
    /dev/sda1 / ext4 rw,errors=remount-ro,commit=0 0 0
    proc /proc proc rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev 0 0
    sysfs /sys sysfs rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev 0 0
    fusectl /sys/fs/fuse/connections fusectl rw 0 0
    none /sys/kernel/debug debugfs rw 0 0
    none /sys/kernel/security securityfs rw 0 0
    udev /dev devtmpfs rw,mode=0755 0 0
    devpts /dev/pts devpts rw,noexec,nosuid,gid=5,mode=0620 0 0
    tmpfs /run tmpfs rw,noexec,nosuid,size=10%,mode=0755 0 0
    none /run/lock tmpfs rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev,size=5242880 0 0
    none /run/shm tmpfs rw,nosuid,nodev 0 0
    binfmt_misc /proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc binfmt_misc rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev 0 0
    gvfs-fuse-daemon /home/saume/.gvfs fuse.gvfs-fuse-daemon rw,nosuid,nodev,user=saume 0 0

    the partition was sda4 and it was an ext4 patition for my files, non bootable

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