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I went to that post you gave me, and I didn't understand how he fixed his problem. I can't understand one thing......
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  1. #11
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    I went to that post you gave me, and I didn't understand how he fixed his problem. I can't understand one thing...

  2. #12
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    Since you can't boot Ubuntu, you will need to use the Ubuntu (or any Linux) Live CD. Boot it to Try without Installing. When you get to the desktop, open a terminal. You can do this by holding down the: Ctrl+Alt+t keys simultaneously. Run this command: sudo fdisk -l (lower case Letter L in the command, not a number one. Hit the Enter key. You should get some output showing your drive(s)/partitions. In the output, you will have at least one partition which shows "Linux" in the System column. You will need to create a mount point and mount that partition to access it. If your Linux (Ubuntu) partition is sda1, you would do: sudo mkdir /mnt/sda1 If your partition has a different number you would obviously need to replace sda1 with the correct partition name.



    The next step is to mount it: sudo mount -t ext4 /dev/sda1 /mnt/sda1

    After doing that, in the terminal type: sudo nautilus. This should open the file manager window as root and you will need to navigate to the /mnt/sda1 directory. When you open nautilus, in the left part of the window you can click on filesystem and you should see the folders in the root of your system which will include /mnt. In the link I provided, the user solved his problem by changing owner:group of the file .ICEauthority . Note the dot at the beginning of this file. If you are in nautilus, you will need to click on the View tab at the top and then click on Show hidden files. A dot preceding a file means it is a hidden file. When you find the file, right click on it in nautilus and then click the permissions tab to see who the owner group is. If it is your username, don't change. If it is root:root change the owner to your username. This is in post six of the link. The other part refers to a problem with an nvidia graphics card. I don't know if you have an nvidia card so that may not be applicable.

    If you make this change, unmount the partition: sudo umount /mnt/sda1.

    I've found a lot of sites dealing with this general problem and there seem to be different solutions depending upon the setup. One thing you might do while you have the partition mounted for Ubuntu is check permissions on your /home/user directory: ls -la /home/ (check permission on the directory for whatever user you are) and also run: ls -la /home/username (replace username in the last command with your actual user name).

  3. #13
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    I don't think I can do the CD thing... Isn't there any commands I could type in directly in the guest account ?(ctrl-alt-f1)

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  5. #14
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    I don't think I can do the CD thing
    Why not? Take it one step at a time. Do you not have the CD? If you can log in to a guest account (?) do the same commands. I understood you were unable to log in at all?? I don't know that the solution to the problem you have will be the same as on the site I linked. I have Ubuntu installed but don't use it much and have never had this problem. If you've just installed it and don't have a lot of data it might be easier to just reinstall and keep notes of every step of the installation in case you have problems.



    What guest account? I thought you couldn't log in at all?

  6. #15
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    No, I think I did not explain well. I cannot login into the "principal account". I type the password, then the screen goes black, and I go back to the menu, but I still have access to the guest account, since I don't have to type any password(I think). But I'll try the commands without the CD (since I don't have it) and see what it does. Thank you alot for your help!!

  7. #16
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    I've installed Ubuntu and its derivatives a number of times and have never had a "guest account". Did you previously have a user account which you created during the installation of Ubuntu which had been working? Generally, the first user created has root (administrator) privileges and you can make changes to the system with that account. Is that the account you are no longer able to access? Did you always have a "guest account"?

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