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Hello all. I followed a guide to setup my new Linux Mint 14 installation on my new SSD: Link to guide My partitions are as follows: /boot on SDA1 / ...
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  1. #1
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    Returning /var/tmp to its rightful place


    Hello all.

    I followed a guide to setup my new Linux Mint 14 installation on my new SSD: Link to guide

    My partitions are as follows:

    /boot on SDA1
    / on SDA3
    /var on SDB2
    /home on SDB3

    I can't paste my fstab output as I'm not at home at the mo.

    Anyway, part of the guide suggests mounting /tmp & /var/tmp as tmpfs by adding the following lines to the end of fstab:

    none /tmp tmpfs nodev,nosuid,mode=1777 0 0
    none /var/tmp tmpfs nodev,nosuid,mode=1777 0 0

    After further research I now know that it is not advisable to mount /var/tmp in this way and I want to reverse this.

    It's probably just a case of deleting the bottom line from fstab and rebooting, but I thought Id check with the experts to make sure there isn't anything else I need to do. Will it find it's way back to it's old location or is there some jiggery pokery I have to do to revert?

    Thanks in advance.

    esqo

  2. #2
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    124
    Quote Originally Posted by esqobar View Post
    Hello all.

    I followed a guide to setup my new Linux Mint 14 installation on my new SSD: Link to guide

    My partitions are as follows:

    /boot on SDA1
    / on SDA3
    /var on SDB2
    /home on SDB3

    I can't paste my fstab output as I'm not at home at the mo.

    Anyway, part of the guide suggests mounting /tmp & /var/tmp as tmpfs by adding the following lines to the end of fstab:

    none /tmp tmpfs nodev,nosuid,mode=1777 0 0
    none /var/tmp tmpfs nodev,nosuid,mode=1777 0 0

    After further research I now know that it is not advisable to mount /var/tmp in this way and I want to reverse this.

    It's probably just a case of deleting the bottom line from fstab and rebooting, but I thought Id check with the experts to make sure there isn't anything else I need to do. Will it find it's way back to it's old location or is there some jiggery pokery I have to do to revert?

    Thanks in advance.

    esqo
    Hi.

    Because some files in /tmp or /var/tmp need to stay (mysql socket for example), the system provides a way to save and restore those files. After restoring /tmp and /var/tmp to regular partitions, you must check the logs to be sure nothing is going to mess in those directories.

  3. #3
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    Hi.

    Thanks for the reply. My understanding is that nothing in /tmp needs to stay, but stuff in /var/tmp is persistent, however the /var/tmp directory is currently empty (because it is in tmpfs and being wiped at every power cycle). This is a virgin build and I haven't even opened many applications yet, so I don't think I need be concerned with anything being messed up in there, but thanks for the cautionary advice.

    I am more concerned with the actual mechanism of restoring /var/tmp to the location of the physical /var directory on sdb2. Am I OK to just delete the line "none /var/tmp tmpfs nodev,nosuid,mode=1777 0 0" from fstab and reboot, or do I need to explicitly tell Linux where /var/tmp should go?

    esqo

  4. #4
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    OK, just to draw a line under this in case anyone finds it who is searching for the same answer, I deleted the above mentioned line from fstab, rebooted and "df /var/tmp" gives a result of:

    Code:
    Filesystem     1K-blocks   Used Available Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sdb2        9843232 887176   8456040  10% /var
    So, to summarise, if you have followed an SSD optimisation guide for Linux and have changed your mind about having the line "none /var/tmp tmpfs nodev,nosuid,mode=1777 0 0" or similar in fstab (to mount /var/tmp to tmpfs), you can simply reverse it by deleting the line and rebooting. /var/tmp will snap back to being on whatever physical media /var is on as when you installed it.

    esqo

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