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And in english does that translate to "root/home/.Trash-0" There is a difference between / and /root. The symbol "/" is for the root of the filesystem and if you open ...
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  1. #11
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    And in english does that translate to "root/home/.Trash-0"
    There is a difference between / and /root. The symbol "/" is for the root of the filesystem and if you open a terminal and run: ls / you will get a totally different output than if you run ls /root. The "/root is the directory for the root user only and you should not need to be there often.

    OK, in the GUI (sudo thunar) filesystem "/home/.Trash-0/info" and "/home/.Trash-0/files" are now the locations of root trash.
    Interesting. Usually on the systems I have used, there are separate Trash directories for each user under /home/user and also under the /root directory in the directories I indicated above. Anyhow, glad you got it deleted.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by yancek View Post
    There is a difference between / and /root. The symbol "/" is for the root of the filesystem and if you open a terminal and run: ls / you will get a totally different output than if you run ls /root. The "/root is the directory for the root user only and you should not need to be there often.
    Right.

    I know that there's a "root" user account, that there is an actual root of the system and that they are tied together but not the same thing.

    So, my question is this: When I'm on a message board trying to ask for help or get my point across what's the accepted convention to differentiate between the two in english so that people know what I'm trying to say?

    Or, should I just try to stay away from english on stuff like that so I don't confuse myself or others?

  3. #13
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    If you are referencing something in the root user directory, you would indicate that with "/root" as the directory and explain it is the user root. The symbol "/", a forward slash, is the symbol for the the entire filesystem. If you run the command: ls / ,you will see /root as one of its sub-directories. /root is just one of the first-level directories under /.

    I guess the easiest way to do it is to say /root user, or root of the fileystem.

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