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Hi, I recently installed WINE on Kubuntu and had no problems following the instructions. Notepad ran (was included in the install I think), so all was good. As this was ...
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    [SOLVED] Where did WINE go?


    Hi, I recently installed WINE on Kubuntu and had no problems following the instructions. Notepad ran (was included in the install I think), so all was good. As this was a new install of Kubuntu (replacing Windows as the original hard disk had died), there were quite a few updates that were ready for installing. I installed them and when I rebooted, the WINE menu had disappeared for some reason.

    Why did it disappear and what can I do to stop it disappearing again?

    Many thanks

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    I suppose my first question would be, are you sure WINE itself is gone and not just the menu item? WINE doesn't usually have a graphical component to it; it's mostly a command-line tool.

    First, open up a console and type wine, just to see if it's still installed. If it is, you can add menu items for it... but unless you have a specific program you want to launch with it I can't think of a use for them.
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    Yes, you are right - the application is still available from the command line. The installer put a set of shortcuts in the applications menu and they have disappeared. Not a huge problem as everything is working fine, but I would like to know why the shortcuts disappeared! The menus must be synchronized to something else perhaps...

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    Quote Originally Posted by samsonite2010 View Post
    Yes, you are right - the application is still available from the command line. The installer put a set of shortcuts in the applications menu and they have disappeared. Not a huge problem as everything is working fine, but I would like to know why the shortcuts disappeared! The menus must be synchronized to something else perhaps...
    That is an odd thing to happen. Did you happen to notice if KDE was updated in that last batch of updates? It's possible a configuration file got overwritten.
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    I think it did actually. It was a fresh install and I grabbed all the updates and applied them, so that might explain it. I will check this out. I think this must be it though, thanks!

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    Might have to re install wine . . If you up graded the kernel it some times removes things I have to re-install VirtualBox after a Update of the Kernnel as it drops it or the program is not linked or setup then

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    Ok, well it is just the shortcuts that have gone and now I realize that they are not really needed. I had not used Wine before and did not know it was so seamless. I downloaded Steam for Windows and it just installed as if it was native and I started downloading some games - not sure how well the games will work, but I will see!

    It seems that most applications run flawlessly.

    I am slightly confused as to why Steam installed much quicker running on Wine than it did on Windows itself on the same laptop?!

    The only single issue I am having with Wine so far is that my Nvidia graphics setup only shows widescreen resolutions, but there are quite a few games which have loading screens using a hard-coded resolutions such as 640x480. What happens in such a case is that a message pops up saying "could not find the video mode 640x480", which is fair enough because I cannot use that resolution for Linux either...

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    You asked '...why Steam installed much quicker running on Wine...' basically Linux is way more efficient than Windoze. I have 12 yr old PCs running linux that originally had win98 on them and they run great with Linux for email, websurfing, file server, print server, samba server all at the same time.
    With your 640x480 screen resolution issue, check the XFree86 setup. I do not know if Kubuntu has a GUI for this (I bet they do) but if not see the /etc/X11/XF86Config file or the /etc/X11/xorg.conf file which is where the screen modes are defined. At least that is where it is in a SUSElinux install (and Mandrake). Be very careful editing these files, if you mess them up you may end up with no graphics screen at all. A good practice is to copy the current config file to a new file name, then edit the config file; if it all gets messed up when you restart the X server then you can just press <CTRL><ALT><F1> ..<F2>.....<F6> which are just basic terminal sessions, login there an revert back. Note that <CTRL><ALT><F7> will bring you back to the Graphics screen. If your XFconfig file says DO NOT EDIT then look for which program created it and use that to edit it.
    What you need here is to add 'Modelines' to the 'Section Modes' and add Modes to the
    Section "Screen"
    DefaultDepth 24
    SubSection "Display"
    You will need to read up on the correct syntax for all this in the XF86 documentation. It is very important to get the Modelines right. There are numbers that need to be calculated there.

    Hopefully there is a thorough Config tool in Kubuntu.

    Once you have several Modes defined a cool feature is to use <CTRL><ALT>+ and <CTRL><ALT>- to instantly cycle through different Modes on your screen, where the '+' and '-' are from the numeric keypad. This is like an instant zoom feature that keeps our desktop the same size and all the windows the same as they were but only displaying a portion of it with the rest as Virtual Screen.
    The real trick on a Laptop is that you need to use the numeric keypad + & -. What do not have one? Well perhaps it is builtinto the regular keyboard with a NumLk key that you need to select it. This does not usually work on my IBM laptop but works great with a full keyboard.

    Oops this has gone off topic from Wine.

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    Thanks brucesam, useful info. I have backed up my xorg.conf and will look at adding those extra modes in.

    Apart from that, the speed of Windows apps is great in Wine (and everything else for that matter)

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    Quote Originally Posted by samsonite2010 View Post
    The only single issue I am having with Wine so far is that my Nvidia graphics setup only shows widescreen resolutions, but there are quite a few games which have loading screens using a hard-coded resolutions such as 640x480. What happens in such a case is that a message pops up saying "could not find the video mode 640x480", which is fair enough because I cannot use that resolution for Linux either...
    Another solution is to enable 'virtual desktop' mode. This constrains wine to a window (whose initial resolution you select) and allows it to change sizes without having to tweak xorg.conf. Also good for windowing those pesky fullscreen games, which tend not to work well on a triplehead setup.

    The appropriate settings are in the 'Graphics' tab of winecfg.

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