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I'm new to the whole "Wine" program, so don't laugh at this Basically, I'm wondering after installing Wine and setting it up, can you run a program that is already ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie SunshineFolk's Avatar
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    Question Simple Wine Question


    I'm new to the whole "Wine" program, so don't laugh at this

    Basically, I'm wondering after installing Wine and setting it up, can you run a program that is already installed on your Windows partition??

    I realize you can just install it through wine and go from there, but if I already have it installed on Windows, I'd rather not install a program again (obviously).

    I've searched and searched for an answer but some say yes, some say no. And ALL the answers I get to this question in search are outdated by like 2 and 4 years. So I would imagine Wine has came a long way since then (hoping). I couldn't even find the answer on the Wine website, and even their tutorials are outdated (but I'd imagine they still work tho).

    Please shed some light on this question for me, please!


    SunshineFolk

  2. #2
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Regretfully, it just doesn't work that way.
    It has to be installed in Wine to run.

    *EDIT*
    If I'm wrong... I would love to know.
    Jay

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  3. #3
    Linux Newbie SunshineFolk's Avatar
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    Thank you very much, fellow Kentuckian

    But that's a shame! Looks like I'll just be dual-booting then to save the *cough* hassle.


    SunshineFolk

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  5. #4
    Linux Newbie SunshineFolk's Avatar
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    Well, I will continue to search and leave this thread open to see if any hardcore Wine users know any workaround or simple solutions. I'll be sure to post any results if found otherwise.


    SunshineFolk

  6. #5
    Just Joined! madhatter632's Avatar
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    with wine the program would have to be installed in wine as jayd512 stated, if you have the program on a windows partition and what your saying is that you want to use that program within linux then maybe what you should do is run samba so you can switch between the 2 partitions.....................

  7. #6
    Linux Newbie SunshineFolk's Avatar
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    Hmm.

    Are you sure? Have you seen this done before?

    My understanding of Samba was that it allows ONLY file sharing/mounting (and printing). To run a program from windows, the .exe would have to be executed which would not run correctly on Linux.

    Now if I was to, lets say, share the needed files by using Samba THEN running them under Wine, maybe that would work?

    I'm sure it would be easiest to just re-install using Wine, or just dual-boot if the program I want to use is far to big than I want to install on my little Linux partition. I know I can get more space easily for my Linux partition or even add another HDD but that is just silly for all this

    I'm gonna look more into this but as of now I can't find anything like that possible just by using Samba. Feel free to prove me wrong though cause I would love to be able to get this up and running!! Links Please!!


    SunshineFolk

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    Wink No and... no.

    In order for a program that must be installed in Misro$oft WinDOS in order to run properly, WINE will need it installed too, since installation puts various files in certain places, and I think also creates need entries in the "registry" (I know M$ WinDOS does this, I think WINE does too, being a WINdos Emulator, (don't flame, I know they say that's not what it stands for, but it emulates M$ WinDOS, for the purpose of running "win" binaries, so hence, that is, I'm afraid, what it is) it would HAVE TO, to provide the programs the environment they need to operate.

    HOWEVER, no, you don't need WINE, there is a better way, though I haven't played with it much myself. You can, I understand, use a program called "VirtualBox", since you already have, as you say, an active, functional WinDOS install, VirtualBox is supposed to emulate a computer, so in theory, you should be able to run the entire (wretched) operating system under VirtualBox, and fool it into thinking it's the only OS running on the computer, which is good because Misro$oft products are notoriously BAD at getting along with other OS'es, etc. Sad as it is to say, to help thwart operating systems becoming more popular than WinDOS, (it'll always be DOS to me, even if they have moved to NTFS, it's still a joke, again... no offense if you like their... software) they have done a bang-up job at making sure it is nearly impossible to make something that is actually so compatible with their miserable software, that it can actually be used to run programs written for it. WINE is probably the closest we have to a way to run M$ WinDOS based binaries WITHOUT having either to pay those... people in Redmond, or pirate their wretchware.

    BUT, again, if you already have a legit copy of... Windows, why not get VirtualBox, (I understand it's free) and run Linux first, pop-open VirtualBox, then boot WinDOS inside that, and run whatever you need to run? It... should work... of course, be aware that running WinDOS will render your system susceptible to viruses and other mal-ware, I think, despite the protections offered by Linux natively, (being inherently more secure, as it was built from the ground up to perform the same way as Unix, which was itself built from the start as a multi-tasking, multi-user system, whereas WinDOS has a legacy of being designed to derive just about all its security from the physical security of the computer itself... which is meaningless if it's connected to the internet, since computers can be made to run whatever arbitrary code anyone might come up with, even if the source of that code is some other country, just the same as if it came off a disc in the very drive of the machine itself.

    But I do go on, don't I. Basically, to recap the answer to your question, OP, WINE should be able to run any program Windows can provided it does NOT need to be installed to run, such as MediaPlayer Classic, (at least it didn't used to need to be installed, you could download it, unpack it, and just run it right there...) but things requiring installation will need to be reinstalled in WINE just so WINE knows where things are. I suppose you might be able to avoid having to install software in WINE, which normally requires installation, if you can figure out how to tell WINE where the files are located, but doing this would (assuming it's even possible) be harder, I would think, and more time-consuming, than simply reinstalling... unless of course, you don't have the install files anymore, or lost the program key, or the trial expired, or whatever...

    The alternative is just to use a virtual machine program, like, (I think, again my experience with it is severely limited) VirtualBox. Of course, if there were a Linux-compatible alternative, that'd probably be the best route, for instance, if you're trying to run M$ Office, why not try OpenOffice instead, which has many (if not most) of the same features, is free, and has the tremendous advantage of not having come from Misro$oft.

    Anyway, best of luck with that balky "win" program.

  9. #8
    Linux Newbie user-f11's Avatar
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    Re: Wine

    Everything depends on your interpretation of WINE. Usually there is a discrepancy between what you think it is and what it actually is.

    1. WINE has nothing to do with the Windows partition on your hard-disk.
    2. WINE is not Windows (TM) emulator, let alone Windows XP or 7, et. al.
    3. WINE is actually Windows compatibility layer for UNIX like systems (in this case Linux).

    WINE is designed for people who are not able to change (their habits), to learn something new, and to accept different approach in software engineering.

    ... and the bad news is that if you install Licensed Software under WINE, your status as OpenSource user is disputable.

  10. #9
    Just Joined! madhatter632's Avatar
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    it's been a while since I've used samba, but I do believe it is capable of running more then doc files, I'm not 100% sure about games though if that is what your trying to do, what exactly are you wanting to run ?
    wine is a good program but don't forget about playonlinux which sometimes helps with a install but with both you'll need to check compatibility to see if your program is even going to work .
    as someone else stated virtualbox or vmware are emulators that if you want to run windows and linux, this method your not dual booting but working from within a window.

  11. #10
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Options for running Windows applications.

    1) Dual boot your system. You'll have an application running natively in the environment is was written for.
    2) Wine. Allows you to run Windows applications in a Linux environment by referencing Windows API's. Works pretty well for most programs.
    3) A virtual machine, as suggested by HalluxSinister. But, depending on the program, this may not be the best choice. Virtual machines can be less efficient than a real machine when accessing hardware indirectly. This can cause a slowdown on execution, performance, and such. If you have a computer running with some horsepower, though, this will be less of an issue.
    Jay

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