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The driver for your wireless is included in the kernel. The module is rtl8180. I have no idea why it would stop working after installing LXDE. Without seeing the exact ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    The driver for your wireless is included in the kernel. The module is rtl8180. I have no idea why it would stop working after installing LXDE. Without seeing the exact error message, I could guess that if you were trying to use ndiswrapper as well, there was a conflict.

    For the nvidia driver, I've always just enabled the non-free repos and downloaded with apt. I know a lot of people seem to prefer getting the driver straight from the vendor, but I've never had an issue so I've never looked into it.

    Creating a local repo with Debian is also pretty quick and simple. Copy all your packages into a folder and run dpkg-scanpackages. (Unless you don't have a regular internet connection, I still don't see why you'd need all 5 DVDs?)

    I agree sometimes Debian can go a little over the top in their pursuit of purely free software - witness the binary blob debacle recently. But I really wouldn't have it any other way. I think there needs to be large group out there that maintains the ideals. As for Firefox, they were allowed to use the name for a while, but it was mozilla that pulled that right because Debian was doing their own security patching. This would have come up regardless of the debate over the logo licensing. Says wikipedia:

    The immediate problem caused by the new policy was Debian's inability to use the official Firefox logo due to its proprietary license failing to comply with the Debian Free Software Guidelines. Additionally, as Debian releases are frozen on a long-term basis, software in the frozen stable releases needs to be patched for any newly-discovered security issue. Under the revised guidelines, in order to use the Firefox name, approval from the Mozilla Corporation would have been required for all security patches, but the Debian project could not put its security in the hands of an external corporation in that manner.[13]
    My point is, all distros have their own quirks, philosophy, and do some things there own way. As users we all have our own preferences. If Debian doesn't suit your tastes, fine, but it doesn't mean that it's a bad distro. Just like Fedora not suiting my taste doesn't make it bad. And like when we moved from Windows to Linux, there is a learning curve as we figure out different ways of doing things. We don't like it when Windows folk complain, "If linux would just do things like windows it'd be great!" We should be careful ourselves not to fall into the same trap with other distros.

  2. #12
    Linux Enthusiast minthaka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by reed9 View Post
    Creating a local repo with Debian is also pretty quick and simple. Copy all your packages into a folder and run dpkg-scanpackages. (Unless you don't have a regular internet connection, I still don't see why you'd need all 5 DVDs?)
    Well, I was asking one of my former pupils to det me all the packages, and even more. He mirrored me also the debian-multimedia repository. I have an internet, still an amount limited one.
    I will try to install it again but on virtual-box. Sincerely, I got bored with Mandriva (it's simply perfect working) but I've expected less troubles at configuration.

    I have 64Studio, and UbuntuStudio they are great. Probably I'd use Ubuntu once again if they fixed the cups and printing system.

    For the repo: the last time I did dpkg-scanpackage, I had to build a directory structure, to place packages inside, to run the command and to add repo manually as a new line in /etc/apt/sources.list (or in synaptic). Has it changed?

    I also missed Firefox and Thunderbird. I didn't find them at all (but Iceweasel and -dove).
    If you need a CD/DVD catalogizer, give a try to my program:
    http://www.kde-apps.org/content/show...content=100682
    Linux Usert#430188

  3. #13
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    There's no doubt that debian is by design not built to just install and go with a fully functional desktop system. Ubuntu and Debian do many things very similarly, so if you're looking for a full fledged desktop out of the box, it probably is the better choice.

    You do still need to add the local repo to your sources.list by hand, I think. I've never really done much with custom repos, and, again, I don't use debian based systems anymore, so I'm not sure. To my understanding, you don't absolutely need to build the directory structure, depending on what sort of repo you're looking to make. If you're trying to stick all the DVDs on your harddrive and have a local repo with those, then yeah, you probably do need to do that. (Or you can just use the DVDs as your repo, rather than copy them to your harddrive.)

    Iceweasel and Icedove are functionally the same as Firefox/Thunderbird. The code is identical, outside of a few patches.

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  5. #14
    Linux Enthusiast minthaka's Avatar
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    Debian even failed to get installed on VIrtualBox. After the setup I got "BUG:cannot handle kernel" message.
    That's all of it.
    If you need a CD/DVD catalogizer, give a try to my program:
    http://www.kde-apps.org/content/show...content=100682
    Linux Usert#430188

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