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Code: Broadcom Corporation BCM4318 [AirForce One 54g] 802.11g Wireless LAN Controller (rev 02) I had a heck of a time getting one of these running under Slackware but eventually got ...
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  1. #11
    Trusted Penguin Dapper Dan's Avatar
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    Code:
    Broadcom Corporation BCM4318 [AirForce One 54g] 802.11g Wireless LAN Controller (rev 02)
    I had a heck of a time getting one of these running under Slackware but eventually got it working like a champ with ndiswrapper. (Even though it is Mepis, this should shed some light). That's been a while back when I ran into those problems so perhaps something has changed. waterhead is extremely knowledgeable about these devices and is a wizard at wireless in general. I think he's our "go to" man on this...
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  2. #12
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    It's actually not difficult to get working with the native linux driver. Which, according to lsmod, is loading (bcm43xx). All you need is the firmware.

    To get the firmware you need to install bcm43xx-fwcutter.
    Code:
    wget http://bu3sch.de/b43/fwcutter/bcm43xx-fwcutter-006.tar.bz2
    tar xjf bcm43xx-fwcutter-006.tar.bz2
    cd bcm43xx-fwcutter-006
    make
    cd ..
    Then get the firmware
    Code:
    export FIRMWARE_INSTALL_DIR="/lib/firmware"
    wget http://downloads.openwrt.org/sources/wl_apsta-3.130.20.0.o
    sudo ./bcm43xx-fwcutter-006/bcm43xx-fwcutter -w "$FIRMWARE_INSTALL_DIR" wl_apsta-3.130.20.0.o
    Make sure FIRMWARE_INSTALL_DIR is appropriate for CentOS. The standard location is /lib/firmware, but it may be different for CentOS, I have no idea.

    Details and instructions can be found at: b43 - Linux Wireless

  3. #13
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    I tried following these step for step, but when I get to the make command for fwcutter, I get the following error:

    Code:
    make: cc: Command not found
    make: **** [fwcutter.o] Error 127
    I searched around a bit before respoding here, and it seems like I need a g++ or c++ compiler in order to use the make command? I know normally I could just download the repo with yum, but as I have no internet *yet*, I'm not sure how to install these otherwise.

    Thanks for all of you guy's help btw, very responsive and very helpful

  4. #14
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    Are you able to temporarily hook up to a wired connection? If so, then you can install all the development tools with
    Code:
    yum groupinstall 'Development Tools'
    Otherwise, you'd need to download the packages to a flash drive or other external drive from a connected machine, transfer them to your CentOS box, and install them manually.

  5. #15
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    Hello.

    The bcm43xx driver is loading for your wireless, and it does need firmware. But it may not be the same firmware that a more modern Linux distro would use. The bcm43xx driver wasn't very good, and has since been replaced by the b43 driver. This driver usually is not available for an older kernel, but it should be in the 2.6.18! If I recall, I had to re-compile the kernel to get the b43 driver in 2.6.18. I doubt that you want to do that.

    Back to the firmware. You may be able to find the firmware version that it is looking for, with this command.
    Code:
    dmesg | grep firmware
    I still don't recommend using the bcm43xx driver. Using NDISwrapper will be better. You will need the WinXP driver for your wireless, and also you must blacklist the bcm43xx driver, to keep it from loading.
    Please do not send Private Messages to me with requests for help. I will not reply.

  6. #16
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    Reed I don't have a direct connection to the internet, my house is 100% wireless. I have no problem downloading the packages and moving them over on a Flash drive, I just don't know where to go to download the packages or how to install them once moved over.

    And to waterhead I don't have an issue using the NDISwrapper either, I'm just not sure how to properly use it. I've heard of it before and heard it works wonders, and I still have the disc with my Windows drivers available on it, just not sure if it would be easier to go that route or try and get my drivers working which are already on the computer.

  7. #17
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    In this case, ndiswrapper would probably be easier. You can probably find a package for it through somewhere like rpmbone. There are some other rpm search sites as well.

    Threads like this make me appreciate Arch so much. I think all of this sort of thing is so much easier than in rpm distros.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by reed9 View Post
    Threads like this make me appreciate Arch so much. I think all of this sort of thing is so much easier than in rpm distros.
    This really has nothing to do with it being an rpm based distro. It is because of RHEL being tied to a stable but older kernel. And because Broadcom firmware is still considered to be proprietary software.

    If he had a more recent version of Fedora installed, I could have provided him with a rpm file that contains the firmware. One line in the terminal would hve then solved his problems.

    Because of the proprietary nature of the firmware, I had to make the firmware rpm myself.
    Please do not send Private Messages to me with requests for help. I will not reply.

  9. #19
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    I don't disagree with you. I was being somewhat facetious, I'm afraid. For whatever reason, I have never felt comfortable with any of the rpm based distros I've used - Mandriva, Fedora, or OpenSuse. For whatever reason, for me, Debian based distros and Arch have always seemed much more intuitive and simple to use. At this point, a lot of that is probably because I am now much more familiar with Arch and Debian than I am with anything else.

    CentOS is very good at what it's designed to do. When it comes to more general use things can be rough. Ever Increasing Entropy: The Ongoing "CentOS 5.3 On A Netbook" Saga

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by waterhead View Post
    This really has nothing to do with it being an rpm based distro. It is because of RHEL being tied to a stable but older kernel. And because Broadcom firmware is still considered to be proprietary software.

    If he had a more recent version of Fedora installed, I could have provided him with a rpm file that contains the firmware. One line in the terminal would hve then solved his problems.

    Because of the proprietary nature of the firmware, I had to make the firmware rpm myself.
    I don't mean to keep changing my mind about what to do, but are you saying that if I got a more updated version of CentOS it would have a newer kernel that would make recognizing my wireless card easier? Because the version of CentOS I used to install was burned about 10 months ago, so if there's a newer version with a more updated kernel I have no qualms about downloading it and re-installing the newer version, if that means it'll take one line from the terminal to recognize the firmware.

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