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Hi All, I am trying to get WiFi working on a embedded platform based on ARM. The problem is I dont have any of the wireless commands like iwconfig or ...
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  1. #1
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    How to enable Wireless commands?


    Hi All,
    I am trying to get WiFi working on a embedded platform based on ARM. The problem is I dont have any of the wireless commands like iwconfig or ifconfig in the linux kernel. Can any body let me know how can I include them in the kernel? I can rebuild the kernel. But I dont have any idea which modules to be included? Or does it have nothing to do with the kernel?

    Thanks,
    Tony

  2. #2
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    They aren't in the kernel. They're part of the wireless tools project.

    Beyond that I'm not familiar enough with embedded platforms to guide you.

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    Hi Reed9,
    Thanks for the post. The command I need is iwconfig. I guess, I can download the source code and build it for my platform from the link you posted . I will let you know how it goes

    Thanks,
    Tony

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    I found that the wireless tools are normally included with the Linux distributuion. Does anybody know how are they included? I mean when I build a new kernel, the tools are also included automatically in the new kernel. I wonder whether the source code is included along with the kernel source code and get built when you built the kernel? If so which is the module in the config file to enabled to build the wifi tools?
    If that is not the case, the wifi tools should be a userspace application...

    Hmm.. Sorry.. Just thinking aloud!

  5. #5
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    You should read the link I posted. It has some info on this.

    Device drivers and wireless extensions are included in the kernel.
    The Wireless Extension (WE) is a generic API allowing a driver to expose to the user space configuration and statistics specific to common Wireless LANs. The beauty of it is that a single set of tool can support all the variations of Wireless LANs, regardless of their type (as long as the driver support Wireless Extension). Another advantage is these parameters may be changed on the fly without restarting the driver (or Linux).

    # In the rare cases where your kernel isn't compiled with Wireless Extensions (/proc/net/wireless non-existent), you need to recompile it with Wireless Extensions (CONFIG_NET_RADIO enabled).
    # After recompiling a kernel with Wireless Extension, you have to recompile your driver or the Pcmcia package as well (and restart it).
    # All versions of Wireless Tools up to version 26 need to be compiled for the precise version of Wireless Extension present on the system. Starting with Wireless Tools 27, Wireless Tools can handle multiple versions of Wireless Extension without recompile.
    # The Wireless Extensions and Wireless Tools version numbers will not match with each other. The Wireless Tools and the Wireless Extensions (the underlying API) evolve independantly of each other. The command iwconfig --version gives you the detail of your setup.
    # Compilation of the Wireless Tools used to be tricky, especially in the header area. I believe this has been fixed for good.
    Wireless tools like iwconfig are userspace tools to manipulate wireless extensions.

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