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You are not using the latest version of modeswitch. I would uninstall the version you have, and install the newest version from source. That means compiling it. You may not ...
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  1. #21
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    You are not using the latest version of modeswitch. I would uninstall the version you have, and install the newest version from source. That means compiling it. You may not have installed all of the programs needed to compile from source code. This is easily done, if you have a working internet connection. You should have this package installed:
    Code:
    sudo apt-get install build-essential
    This actually is a mega-package, that pulls in several needed packages. So this isn't something that you can download using windows.

    I would suggest finding somewhere where you can connect, like a library, cafe or friend's house.

    You may also be able to install it using the DVD installation disk, or MAYBE the CD installation disk.
    Please do not send Private Messages to me with requests for help. I will not reply.

  2. #22
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    Thanks waterhead, I'll see if I can download it at a cafe. will keep you updated.

  3. #23
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    I must repeat that you MUST uninstall the current version of usb_modeswitch before installing the new version!

    While you have a working internet connection, download these two files to your home folder:

    http://www.draisberghof.de/usb_modes...-1.1.3.tar.bz2
    http://www.draisberghof.de/usb_modes...100707.tar.bz2

    They are compressed files, so unpack them with theses commands:
    Code:
    tar xvfj usb-modeswitch-1.1.3.tar.bz2
    Code:
    tar xvfj usb-modeswitch-data-20100707.tar.bz2
    You then change directory to each newly created folder:
    Code:
    cd usb-modeswitch-1.1.3
    And run these commands:
    Code:
    make
    Code:
    sudo make install
    Now the other folder:
    Code:
    cd ~/usb-modeswitch-data-20100707
    Code:
    make
    Code:
     sudo make install
    You should now have version 1.1.3 installed:
    Code:
    usb_modeswitch -e
    Last edited by waterhead; 07-24-2010 at 05:08 PM.
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  4. #24
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    I really admire the determination that both of you are showing in an effort to resolve this issue. I hope he gets that piece of hardware to work. Don't quit.

  5. #25
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    Not all 3G modems are this hard to get working in Linux. It also shows the importance of getting the most recent versions of things. Somebody has already figured out the configuration, and added it to the app. No need to reinvent the wheel.

    It also sounds a lot harder than it actually is. A semi-experienced Linux user would have this up-and-running in a short time. 10-15 minutes to do everything.
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  6. #26
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    I suppose I was lucky in that I was able to set up my wireless card from within the desktop environment. I would like to learn how to use the terminal, but I haven't had any practical reason to open it up. I'm still trying to understand the structure of the system.

    Is Inkit performing all of these procedures from within the root account?

  7. #27
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    Ubuntu/Mint actually doesn't have a root account, they did away with it for some reason. That is why I have the sudo (superuser do) command preceding certain commands. This gives temporary 'root' permissions, when needed.

    There is almost no reason to have to log in as root. On systems without sudo, just using su will give root permissions.
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  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by waterhead View Post
    That is why I have the sudo (superuser do) command preceding certain commands. This gives temporary 'root' permissions, when needed.
    .
    How does that work without a password? I don't doubt you; it just seems strange that you can access the privileges of the super user by using a simple command without logging into the root.

    Opening the terminal, I've noticed that there are certain folders that I cannot access, certain directories that I cannot create while I'm in my user account. However, when I'm in the super user account, I can do both. The system seems pretty rigid in its hierarchical structure, so I'm a little confused that it can be subverted.

    Thank you for your input.

  9. #29
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    When sudo or su are used, it will prompt you to enter your (root) password. Sudo is used along with other commands, while su is used alone, and it will give you a root terminal.
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