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Hi all, I am newbie to linux, I am dealing with Fedora core 13. I have already succeedded in building an ad hoc network and a WLAN network. My next ...
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    Bulk and real data transfer over ad hoc/WLAN network under Fedora 13


    Hi all,

    I am newbie to linux, I am dealing with Fedora core 13. I have already succeedded in building an ad hoc network and a WLAN network. My next step is to get some networking statistics such delay, throughput, etc. So, I need traffic to flow through the network for both multimedia traffic and bulk data traffic.

    My question is:
    How to send files between nodes on the network (I found commands ftp, rcp but do not know whether they are the correct choice for this). ID their any application to perform this?

    Also, I want to perform some video streaming between two nodes to study the behavior of real time data transfer. Is thier any application to perform this?

    Waiting your help!!

    Gaby

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    What kind of performance you get depends a lot upon the tools you use, and how you configure them. Learning how to do that most effectively will take some time and experience. Check out network file systems such as Samba, NFS, and Andrew. Those allow you to mount remote systems from others (like windows sharing, which Samba supports), and copy directly from one computer's file system to another. Then there are remote copy tools such as rcp, scp, and rsync. The rsync tools are used a lot for remote file backups. Tools like rcp and scp are for copying files from one system to another, without needing to remotely mount the file system, much like ftp (which isn't particularly efficient, although ubiquitous). So, unlike Windows, you have a lot of options to choose from. Each will provide the best mix of performance, flexibility, and ease of use for different requirements. Backup? Use rsync. Direct, but infrequent copying? Use rcp or scp (scp is rcp but with encryption - not really necessary for local network copies generally). Frequent file access (read & write)? Mount the remote file system directly using NFS or Samba (Andrew is great for WAN/Internet uses, but hard to configure properly), and simply use normal tools (GUI or command line) to copy files in either direction.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Thanks so much for the very useful reply, I really appreciate.

    I did an extensive search and I found that many people recommended to use the following applications:

    FileZilla: for file sharing and bulk adat transfer.
    VideoLAN Client & VideoLAN Server: for video streaming (realtime data transfer).

    What do you think? Are they safe choices to be used?

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabrial View Post
    Thanks so much for the very useful reply, I really appreciate.

    I did an extensive search and I found that many people recommended to use the following applications:

    FileZilla: for file sharing and bulk adat transfer.
    VideoLAN Client & VideoLAN Server: for video streaming (realtime data transfer).

    What do you think? Are they safe choices to be used?
    They are both commonly used tools. VideoLAN is definitely a good choice for streaming media. I haven't used FileZilla personally, but it doesn't have any negative reports that I'm aware of. Generally, open source tools are safe. After all, you can download and inspect the source code, and then build that directly on your system, so you know without doubt what you have.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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