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So I have been looking at getting a new laptop from asus and a lot of there higher end laptops have what I believe is called wi-max I think. It ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! DGrier's Avatar
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    wi-max cards?


    So I have been looking at getting a new laptop from asus and a lot of there higher end laptops have what I believe is called wi-max I think. It is a wireless card where you can get internet from a provider so you do not have to worry about having a hot spot. What I was wondering does anyone know if Ubuntu wireless drivers support this and further more I have no interest in a contract so will that card work as a wireless card for my wireless router? Or are those for only contract providers? Thanks for any information.

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    Wimax is a technology which some cell providers are calling 4g, such as Sprint (in the US). It is also known as Wibro, and by that name is more popular in places like Korea.
    That said, it is almost exclusively something you would need to enter with a contact with some big company to use, presuming a carrier in your area has wimax available at all. However, I do believe Linux has drivers available for it, though I am not certain.

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    Just Joined! DGrier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryokimball View Post
    Wimax is a technology which some cell providers are calling 4g, such as Sprint (in the US). It is also known as Wibro, and by that name is more popular in places like Korea.
    That said, it is almost exclusively something you would need to enter with a contact with some big company to use, presuming a carrier in your area has wimax available at all. However, I do believe Linux has drivers available for it, though I am not certain.
    I hope that is not the case cause I am not going to sign to pay for something when I have wifi at home or I am in places where there is no service being Navy and all.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Current kernels have WiMax support built in (or as loadable modules). The biggest issue is being in range of your service provider, and note that WiMax (or 4G wireless) is not universally available. Personally, I use my Nexus One 3G phone as a modem or hotspot and get 2-3mbps as long as there is a 3G tower in range, and Edge speeds (about 200-700kbps) if not. Fortunately, this is an unlocked phone, so I don't have to pay AT&T the extra tethering fee...
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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