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I set up on my PC a new Debian GNU linux install that boots from HDD however I ALSO have a fairly similar version of Debian GNU linux (TAILS) that ...
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  1. #1
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    an interesting WIFI setup question...


    I set up on my PC a new Debian GNU linux install that boots from HDD however I ALSO have a fairly similar version of Debian GNU linux (TAILS) that runs solely off a CD/DVD or a flash drive...

    IF I can use this disk on the desktop and it connects to the WIFI/internet just fine... how do I tell the linux on the HDD to just use the same setup that the Disk is using???

    UPDATE!
    I burnt the .ISO to DVD and It DID work! The PC I have when booted off the DVD, DOES connect to the Internet the way it's supposed to... SO, now all I really need to do is tell the HDD Linux how to see whatever it is that the DVD Linux is seeing. Can anyone out there explain to me how to do this?

    Does this sound like a feasible solution to the "noob can't connect to the internets" problem I seem to be having???

    I started this thread not because I'm impatient but more like I'm just trying to think of some more innovative solutions to the problem. also even tho it's WAY over my head and I KNOW it's way over my head... I will still appreciate knowing just what sort of boundaries can be pushed with Linux.

    aside from that it may be interesting to know if...

    Since I have heard of dual booting and I know it's possible to have more than 1 OS on a system at a time but if I understand correctly it's also possible to be running 2 OS simultaneously... maybe this can be done to make it easier for the non internet seeing OS to be taught how to see the internet...


    Just tossing out ideas since I really don't know what CAN and cant be done here...

    let me know what you all think.

    cheers
    Last edited by Kodocha; 12-06-2011 at 07:11 PM. Reason: Edited for clarity... Original post was done late at night and I realized it was unintelligible.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    A lot of the time the live dvd version will have all the drivers installed so that you can determine that it does support your hardware. However, when you install to the HDD, some of those drivers or firmware that require proprietary parts will not be installed by default, which is how Debian and Ubuntu (a Debian derivation) work. So, go to the System->Administration or System->Preferences menus and see if there is a "Hardware Drivers" or similar entry. If so, then it should list the proprietary drivers that you need to install. Since you won't have the WiFi working, you may need to have a wired network like so it can be downloaded.

    Finally, if there is still no joy in Mudville, go to Welcome - Linux Wireless. They have drivers for just about all the WiFi cruft out there, which is where I had to go to get my Dell D630 laptop wireless working with Scientific Linux (RHEL) 6.1.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Debian fanatical approach is not very fun for people that aren't elite alpha geeks. The default Debian install doesn't include the firmware needed by many wireless cards because it is "tainted". You have to make sure that "nonfree" is listed in the /etc/apt/sources.list and find alternate way to get internet, like a temporary wired Ethernet connection and install the linux firmware package. I believe "apt-get install linux-firmware-nonfree" will do the trick.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bakegoodz View Post
    Debian fanatical approach is not very fun for people that aren't elite alpha geeks. The default Debian install doesn't include the firmware needed by many wireless cards because it is "tainted". You have to make sure that "nonfree" is listed in the /etc/apt/sources.list and find alternate way to get internet, like a temporary wired Ethernet connection and install the linux firmware package. I believe "apt-get install linux-firmware-nonfree" will do the trick.
    I agree that the attitudes of a lot of Linux distribution maintainers is skewed. Just because some software is not FOSS should not be, IMO, a reason to make its use, necessary for many systems today, difficult for Linux users. I have a LOT of experience installing, using, developing Linux system software, and it still gives me a PITA when I want to use my laptop with Broadcom wireless gear. Every time I install a new OS or OS version, I have to go back to the same old crud of figuring out which drivers and firmware should be installed with my new OS... Every time it is a wasted several hours, or a day. That says every time I go through this, it costs me over $1000 USD in lost productivity. Ubuntu 9.04 was the last version of Ubuntu that did not do this to me. Everything worked out-of-the-box - WiFi, bluetooth, webcam, broadband USB wireless, and my Android phone as a USB broadband modem. Nothing needed to be installed, configured, or futzed with in any manner. This is, to me, how it should work, and I could care less if the software that make it work is FOSS or not! I'd prefer that it was FOSS, but that plays second fiddle to my personal productivity!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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