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Hi all, Ubuntu 11.10 64bit Linksys Wireless-G Broadband Router WRT54G v2 I'm prepared changing ISP. Currently I'm running ADSL with 6MB download speed, wire LAN connection. The new ISP shall ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Guru
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    About Linksys wireless router


    Hi all,

    Ubuntu 11.10 64bit

    Linksys Wireless-G Broadband Router WRT54G v2

    I'm prepared changing ISP. Currently I'm running ADSL with 6MB download speed, wire LAN connection. The new ISP shall provide 4MB/4MB DSL with wireless LAN connection. The captioned wireless router will be provided by new ISP.

    After searching on Internet it was found that the Data Transfer Rate of the wireless router is 54 Mbps. It will be sufficient for Internet connection of 4MB/4MB. But it will be slow for transfer of Data on LAN. It is there any suggestion other than requesting new ISP for supplying wireless router with 1G data transfer rate?

    Furthermore will it be any problem on installing the Linksys wireless network interface card to Linux PC?

    Thanks in advance.

    B.R.
    satimis

  2. #2
    oz
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    You should be fine with that router. I have a couple of the WRT54GL models and am quite happy with them.
    oz

  3. #3
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    Hi oz,

    Thanks for your advice.

    The new ISP informed me on email that the wireless rounter max supports 5 PC. What does it mean? Whether they only supply 5 Linksys Wireless-G PCI cards? Any problem in installing the PCI card on Linux box?

    Is there USB connection wireless PCI card for this model?

    TIA

    B.R.
    satimis

  4. #4
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by satimis View Post
    The new ISP informed me on email that the wireless rounter max supports 5 PC. What does it mean? Whether they only supply 5 Linksys Wireless-G PCI cards? Any problem in installing the PCI card on Linux box?

    Is there USB connection wireless PCI card for this model?
    I'm not sure what they mean by that. I have 3 PCs, about a dozen miscellaneous wireless devices, and half a dozen miscellaneous wired devices on mine, although I did have to add a network switch to add more than 4 wired devices.

    I've used both, Linksys and Intel NICS with no problems, but most any Linux compatible NIC should work fine.
    oz

  5. #5
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    satimus,

    When you get the router, you will see that it probably has 5 rj45 ports on it. It's this that your isp is saying a the max supported PCs.

    I have one that has 4 rj45 plus a wlan ap. I only use one rj45 and connect this to a switch. All my wired boxes are then connected to the switch. The various wlan clients just connect directly to the router.

    Cheers - VP

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by voidpointer69 View Post
    satimus,

    When you get the router, you will see that it probably has 5 rj45 ports on it. It's this that your isp is saying a the max supported PCs.

    I have one that has 4 rj45 plus a wlan ap. I only use one rj45 and connect this to a switch. All my wired boxes are then connected to the switch. The various wlan clients just connect directly to the router.

    Cheers - VP
    One of the rj45 jacks is the wlan port. The WRT54G supports 4 hardwired LAN connections. My guess is that the ISP is going to provide a maximum of 1 wireless card, so they're saying 4 wired + 1 wireless = 5 total.

    My guess is also that they're going to provide a WRT54G2, not a WRT54G v2 (which is a much older model and probably better hardware).

  7. #7
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    Hi all,

    Thanks for your advice.

    A further question, can fixed IP work on wireless router?

    The new ISP overlooked my request which was made on email previously. When I further contacted them to confirm my requirement on fixed IP address they responded only wired router will be provided.

    B.R.
    satimis

  8. #8
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    Hi Satimis,

    My router can connect to the internet either via a "usb stick" modem attached to it or via a fixed wire connection. Either way, my ISP here in Finland will allow me a fixed IP if I want it although they would charge me more per month. I have a DHCP given address for the router.

    Can I ask why you need a fixed IP? I provide outside world access to one of my boxes using the free dyndns service at freedns.afraid.org. Just register a domain name there and provide your real (ie the router's) IP as and when that changes.

    For this, all I do is monitor the router's address via curl (curl -s http://ip.dnsexit.com/) and, if it changes use wget to post http://freedns.afraid.org/dynamic/update.php?your-update-url-here". They use the inbound tcp address to update their records and propagate them. Works very well for low-volume traffic.


    Cheers - VP

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by satimis View Post

    A further question, can fixed IP work on wireless router?
    Yes, fixed IP is fine on a WRT54G, or any other wireless router.

  10. #10
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    Hi VP,

    Thanks for your advice.

    Actually router is not very important to me. All servers are running on a virtual machine. The desktop connected to router is for remote admin the virtual machine.

    My current contract shall expire on about mid April, 2012. According to the contract term I must submit 2 month notice to ISP if I'm not prepared to renew it.

    Current contract: - 6Mbps ADSL, 1 fixed IP and 3 free email accounts of 6MB storage each.

    I expect to change ADSL to DSL also with 1 fixed IP. I have no specific requirement on free email account. I only use it to communicate with ISP. Therefore 1 free email account will be sufficient. I'm now in contact with 2 new ISPs


    1)
    Broadband service provider via telephone line.
    4Mbps/4Mbps DSL (2 year contract), 1 fixed IP and 3 free email account each of 50MB storage. The monthly subscription is cheaper than my current contract by 10%. Free wired router will be provided

    2)
    Fibre-to-the-home/building broadband service provider
    100Mbps/100Mbps DSL (2 year contract), 1 fixed IP and 1 free email account of 20MB storage. The monthly subscription is about 47% more expensive than my current contract. No router will be provided. They will provide Cat5-E connection to their fibre network.

    I'm quite interested on their speed except the monthly subscription is more expensive. I may consider their service if they can give me a better offer. Additionally I'll request fibre connection to their fibre network.

    After having all information ready I'll negotiate with my current ISP to check whether they can offer DSL. What will be the monthly subscription of a renewed contract? I have been using this ISP for 6 years. If I renew the contract it will be the 4th contract.


    Quote Originally Posted by voidpointer69 View Post
    -snip-

    Can I ask why you need a fixed IP? I provide outside world access to one of my boxes using the free dyndns service at freedns.afraid.org. Just register a domain name there and provide your real (ie the router's) IP as and when that changes.

    For this, all I do is monitor the router's address via curl (curl -s http://ip.dnsexit.com/) and, if it changes use wget to post http://freedns.afraid.org/dynamic/update.php?your-update-url-here". They use the inbound tcp address to update their records and propagate them. Works very well for low-volume traffic.
    I used that technology several years ago. Late I found it NOT convenient for several domains. With fixed IP I can use it for several domains. Each domain runs on a virtual server.

    B.R.
    satimis

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