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Travel is always good ! I have no luck. Here's what I get when doing networking restart: Code: lucky@cornucopia:~$ sudo /etc/init.d/networking restart Running /etc/init.d/networking restart is deprecated because it may ...
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  1. #61
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    Travel is always good !

    I have no luck. Here's what I get when doing networking restart:
    Code:
    lucky@cornucopia:~$ sudo /etc/init.d/networking restart
    Running /etc/init.d/networking restart is deprecated because it may not enable again some interfaces ... (warning).
    Reconfiguring network interfaces...SIOCDELRT: No such process
    done.
    lucky@cornucopia:~$
    I couldn't access any websites either.

    Amanda
    Last edited by amanda099; 03-30-2012 at 12:05 AM.

  2. #62
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    You could have set up your static IP address in networkmanager...

    Anyway, resolv.conf is getting overwritten by the networkmanager and/or dhclient daemons - this is probably 90% of your problem. dhclient tends to update nameservers in resolv.conf when it acquires a dhcp lease. Actually removing networkmanager may be a good starting point...

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by cynwulf View Post
    You could have set up your static IP address in networkmanager...
    I have set up my static IP address:
    Code:
    lucky@cornucopia:~$ cat /etc/network/interfaces 
    # This file describes the network interfaces available on your system 
    # and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5). 
    # The loopback network interface 
    auto lo 
    iface lo inet loopback 
    # The primary network interface 
    allow-hotplug eth0 
    #NetworkManager#iface eth0 inet dhcp 
    auto eth0 
    iface eth0 inet static 
    address 192.168.0.15 
    netmask 255.255.255.0 
    gateway 192.168.0.1
    Quote Originally Posted by cynwulf View Post
    Anyway, resolv.conf is getting overwritten by the networkmanager and/or dhclient daemons - this is probably 90% of your problem. dhclient tends to update nameservers in resolv.conf when it acquires a dhcp lease.
    I believe you are right because the following nameservers I add into /etc/resolv.conf will be erased every time after I reboot my Debian:
    Code:
    nameserver 193.162.153.164 
    nameserver 194.239.134.83
    Quote Originally Posted by cynwulf View Post
    Actually removing networkmanager may be a good starting point...
    Really appreciate if you could show me how to remove networkmanager !

    Amanda

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by amanda099 View Post
    Really appreciate if you could show me how to remove networkmanager !
    Documentation is available for this:
    Code:
    man apt-get
    man aptitude
    If you are going to be administering a server, these are the absolute basics you will need to know as a Debian user.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by cynwulf View Post
    If you are going to be administering a server, these are the absolute basics you will need to know as a Debian user.
    But first of all I need to remove networkmanager, right ?

    Amanda

  6. #66
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    aptitude or apt-get will enable you to remove networkmanager. I don't think it's fair to ask members here to school you on every aspect of maintaining a Debian system - there are "easier" distros you might like to try.

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by amanda099 View Post
    But first of all I need to remove networkmanager, right ?
    Correct. After that, edit your /etc/resolv.conf once more to include your DNS entries.
    Restart networking, or reboot.
    You should, hopefully, be good to go.
    Jay

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  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by jayd512 View Post
    Correct. After that, edit your /etc/resolv.conf once more to include your DNS entries.
    Restart networking, or reboot.
    You should, hopefully, be good to go.
    I still couldn't remove networkmanager, man apt-get or man aptitude don't shed light on how to remove networkmanager.

    However, I read that: (http://wiki.debian.org/NetworkManage..._are_Unmanaged)
    Enabling Interface Management
    If you want NetworkManager to handle interfaces that are enabled in /etc/network/interfaces:

    Set managed=true in /etc/NetworkManager/NetworkManager.conf.
    Restart NetworkManager:
    /etc/init.d/network-manager restart


    My /etc/NetworkManager/NetworkManager.conf
    Code:
    lucky@cornucopia:~$ cat /etc/NetworkManager/NetworkManager.conf
    [main]
    plugins=ifupdown,keyfile
    
    [ifupdown]
    managed=false
    Does managed=false mean NetworkManager has been removed ?

    BTW, why do I always get this warning every time I restart networking:
    Code:
    lucky@cornucopia:~$ sudo /etc/init.d/networking restart 
    Running /etc/init.d/networking restart is deprecated because it may not enable again some interfaces ... (warning).
    Reconfiguring network interfaces...done.
    Amanda
    Last edited by amanda099; 04-04-2012 at 12:43 AM.

  9. #69
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    The usual way to use apt-get to remove a package is similar to installing.
    To install:
    Code:
    sudo apt-get install <package>
    So, to remove something:
    Code:
    sudo apt-get remove <package>
    sudo apt-get remove network-manager will remove it from your system.

    The Network Manager application, when used, will often overwrite your specified DNS settings in /etc/resolv.conf.
    As far as the warning goes, I'm not familiar enough with Debian to be able to answer that correctly right now. But I can do some Googling in a little while to help shed some light on that.
    Jay

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    New Member FAQ
    Registered Linux User #463940
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  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by amanda099 View Post
    I still couldn't remove networkmanager, man apt-get or man aptitude don't shed light on how to remove networkmanager.
    Code:
    man apt-get

    remove
    remove is identical to install except that packages are removed instead of installed. Note the removing a package leaves its configuration files in system. If a plus sign is appended to the package name (with no intervening space), the identified package will be installed instead of removed.

    purge
    purge is identical to remove except that packages are removed and purged (any configuration files are deleted too).
    The warning is a warning, not an error. You can safely ignore it for now.

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