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I have a Linksys WRT54GL that I flashed with DD-wrt. This has been a great router for many a year. My ISP, a cable company, recently upgraded their network and ...
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  1. #1
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    Slow Wifi Speeds


    I have a Linksys WRT54GL that I flashed with DD-wrt. This has been a great router for many a year. My ISP, a cable company, recently upgraded their network and I can get 30 Mbps down. This works flawlessly when I wire my laptops to the router. However, with wifi, I am pulling down only about 8-14 Mbps.

    Any thoughts?

    Pertinent Information
    Router Firmware: DD-WRT v24-sp2 (10/10/09) std
    Network Mode: G-only
    Channel: 10 (least noisy channel available)
    Security: WPA2 Personal Mixed with AES Algorithm
    Laptop OS's: Debian 6, Debian Testing

  2. #2
    Just Joined! gazalovespells's Avatar
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    not an expert at this but wired is faster that wireless

  3. #3
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    You're absolutely right. Most home networks have a 10/100 switch incorporated with the router. Anymore, it is not uncommon to see even gigabit ethernet switches with home routers. Wireless speeds are based upon what 802.11 standard they adhere to. My router only supports 802.11 b/g; and the highest speed I can achieve is 54 Mbps with the g network. More modern routers support 802.11 b/g/n, and can achieve a data rate of about 300 Mbps.

    Since my router supports speeds of up to 54 Mbps, I had assumed that each device on the network could achieve the speed my ISP delievers (30 Mbps). This, however, is incorrect. The total bandwidth of the network is 54 Mbps -- that includes download speeds for each connected device, as well as their upload speeds.

    The solution to my problem would be to purchase a new router-- one that supports wireless-n speeds.

  4. #4
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    It also depends on the distance between the router and your laptop, if there is a long distance, you may need one more wifi repeater to strengthen the signal.

  5. #5
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Try turning of IPV6 in your internet connection
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