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I had a windows 7 computer that I would use in our lab to connect to the wifi from the main school building and share over our network using a ...
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  1. #1
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    Share wifi connection over ethernet


    I had a windows 7 computer that I would use in our lab to connect to the wifi from the main school building and share over our network using a switch. The computer died. I have a backup, that I can load linux on. However, I have no idea how to share the wifi. Can you help me with which version of linux would be best suited to this and give instruction on how to make it work? I would appreciate it. We have our big robotics kickoff next week and we really need our computer lab up and running.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Linux Newbie
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    Misterb.

    If I understand it correctly, you have a box that has two network interfaces. One is wireless and can connect to a wireless Access Point(AP) and the other is a wired interface connected to a switch.

    The switch has other boxes connected to it and you want them to use you as their gateway to the outside world via the AP.

    Have you tried enabling your box as a router? I think you might only need to "enable forwarding" in your network configuration. All the other boxes should set you as their default router.

    Next point to consider is how they get their IP addresses. You could run a DHCP server on your box. Give them yourself as default router and the same addresses for DNS servers as you got from the AP - always assuming you got your address from the AP. This will mean that your wired connections will run on a different address than the AP. If the AP gives you something like 192.168.1.NNN, your switched net could be 192.168.2.0.

    If you want to act as an AP, google it up. I'm sure I've seen tutorials on it but have not done this myself. I use the method I have outlined above with the minor difference that I use fixed IP address ranges.

    Cheers - VP

  3. #3
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    Get a dd-wrt enabled wireless router(a cheap one!) off from a craigslist. In fact, Buffalo routers are already equipped with dd-wrt nowadays. And, set it as a "client bridge".

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  5. #4
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Hello, Misterb. Welcome to LinuxForums!
    Many mainstream Linux distros use the Network Manager applet to handle your connections. Mint, Ubuntu and Fedora come to mind as using NM by default.
    Network Manager lets you easily share the connection via Ethernet with a few simple clicks. This is, of course, assuming that your switch is still configured properly to allocate IP addresses.
    Jay

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