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Well, long story short Frontier Communications tried to screw me on the cost of my interweb service so I canceled it and got a new account with them at a ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Can a NetGear 7550 be used as a Hot Spot?


    Well, long story short Frontier Communications tried to screw me on the cost of my interweb service so I canceled it and got a new account with them at a much cheaper rate. Guess they give price brakes to "new" customers but not those of us who've had em' for 15 years.
    So, I had hopped that they'd have send me a better modem then the NetGear 7550(i.e. Siemens 567) that I currently have so I could put dd-wrt on it and run something decent on my modem but I got the same POS. So, what I wonder is can I hook this up somehow to act as a Hot Spot in my other room to boost my current wifi signal in that room? The modem in use in at one end of the house in my computer room and there I have 5 bars, nice strong wifi signal but at the other end where my Roku is and where I use my laptop sometime I only get 2 bars. If I could hook up the other modem at that end of the house and set it up to boost the signal somehow that'd be awesome so I'd not have it just sitting around.
    So what do ya'll think, is it possible or do I just keep it as a back up modem or what? Thanks.
    No matter where ya' go, there ya' are.

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Ok, been looking around on the Interweb and I think I've answered my own question here. NO, I can't use it as a hot spot so the question becomes, is a NetGear 7550 worth the $10 bucks they want for it just to have it as a back up modem or should I send it back for credit? I think $10 really isn't too bad for a modem even if it is a POS, at least I'd have a spare in case the modem I'm using now ever died on me.
    No matter where ya' go, there ya' are.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Assuming they are wifi access points with embedded routers, it should be possible to use one as a router (the one connected to the internet), and disable routing in the other, configuring it as a switch and wifi access point with a different SSID (and channel) than the main one. The only issue is that you will need to physically connect them, either with a cat-5 cable, or a power-line adapter and cat-5 cables. The last bit is what we do in our home. My main router/AP is in my basement office, and it handles the front of the house and basement. The other AP/switch is in my wife's office in the back of the house and it handles her office, our bedroom, and back porch. We use a power-line adapter to connect the two. It has been working great this way going on 8 years now.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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