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  1. #1

    MAC address changes


    I have tried 3 distros: Elementry, Zorin, and Mint. I booted to them from USB. All of them change the MAC address automatically. I guess that is a good feature for mobile use, but my router has MAC filtering on it - SO I don't get connected. I disabled it on my router and connected. The system connects fine when running Windows 10 without disabling MAC filtering.
    So can I disable the change on the USB, or does it need to be installed to do it, or can I even do it when it is installed. I know I can reset it to whatever I want, but I am looking for a switch change/don't change.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by ruggb View Post
    All of them change the MAC address automatically.
    how did you come to that conclusion?
    i thought a MAC address was hardware specific:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MAC_address
    If a post is too long and unstructured I might miss important information.
    How to ask smart questions | You can post a link by removing "http://www." from it!

  3. #3
    MAC addresses are burned into the hardware, but you can change the address in Linux. Apparently, now with ver 18 it automatically spoofs the address everytime you connect. It is suppose to be a "feature" when connecting to hotspots. I don't remember it doing that in 13 (the last one I tried). I haven't found out how to stop it from doing that now. Obviously, I can change it to the h/w address, but it will be required each time I reconnect, or it will never do it on a hotspot if I set it permanent.
    Under Windows the computer connects to my router, booting to linux requires me to disable MAC filtering to connect. I didn't verify the actual MAC addresses, but that is pretty convincing that linux changed it.

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  5. #4
    Linux Engineer Segfault's Avatar
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    I do not know how systemd handles wireless connections, but ...

  6. #5
    Of course, bottom line is = there is nothing that is secure. Only things that slow down the determined. The mass of "stuff" that I have on my network would probably slow down a hacker much more than the MAC filter, but it does stop non-hackers. as does WAP. Bottom line is there is little of value on the network to anybody but me to make it worth the effort. And it is all backed up someplace offline.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by ruggb View Post
    Apparently, now with ver 18 it automatically spoofs the address everytime you connect.
    i'm still not fully convinced, but if it really does that, i'm sure that behavior can be switched off.
    maybe you can find help here: https://linuxmint.com/links.php
    and here's a search result form the forums- there's at least one long thread how to DO spoof, maybe from that you can deduce the opposite.
    from what little i see, try
    Code:
    systemctl|grep macchanger
    or
    Code:
    sudo find / -iname '*macchanger*'
    (@segfault, even if this a systemd service, it doesn't mean it's systemd's fault)

    Quote Originally Posted by ruggb View Post
    as does WAP.
    i hope you meant WPA (as compared to WEP).
    If a post is too long and unstructured I might miss important information.
    How to ask smart questions | You can post a link by removing "http://www." from it!

  8. #7
    Linux Engineer Segfault's Avatar
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    (@segfault, even if this a systemd service, it doesn't mean it's systemd's fault)
    I never said it is systemd fault. I merely stated I do not know where to look. Please read posts more carefully.

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