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I started out with a fresh install of Xubuntu, installed ndiswrapper, and loaded the drivers (prisma02.inf and prisma02.sys) for my DWL-G120 usb wireless reciever. I used Code: sudo ndiswrapper -i ...
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  1. #1
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    DWL-G120 in Xubuntu


    I started out with a fresh install of Xubuntu, installed ndiswrapper, and loaded the drivers (prisma02.inf and prisma02.sys) for my DWL-G120 usb wireless reciever.

    I used
    Code:
    sudo ndiswrapper -i prisma02.inf
    to load the driver, and I also did
    Code:
    sudo ndiswrapper -d 2001:3701 prisma02
    to assign the prisma02 driver to my wireless. I also did
    Code:
    sudo modprobe ndiswrapper
    I've gone to Administration > Networking tab, activated wlan0, went to Properties and entered in my Network Name and WEP code. The power light on my wireless reciever is flashing, but it won't stay lit and the connection light is not lit.

    Here is some other info:
    Code:
    sudo lshw
    
       *-usb:1
                          description: Generic USB device
                          product: DWL-G120 Spinnaker 802.11b
                          vendor: D-Link Corp. [hex]
                          physical id: 3
                          bus info: usb@1:1.3
                          version: 2.03
                          capabilities: usb-2.00
                          configuration: driver=ndiswrapper maxpower=500mA speed=12.0MB/s
    
      *-network
           description: Wireless interface
           physical id: 1
           logical name: wlan0
           serial: 00:0f:3d:39:d3:98
           capabilities: ethernet physical wireless
           configuration: broadcast=yes link=no multicast=yes wireless=IEEE 802.11g


    Code:
    sudo iwconfig
    
    wlan0     IEEE 802.11g  ESSID:off/any
              Mode:Managed  Frequency:2.462 GHz  Access Point: Not-Associated
              Bit Rate:2 Mb/s   Tx-Power:32 dBm
              RTS thr:2347 B   Fragment thr:2346 B
              Encryption key:off
              Power Management:off
              Link Quality:0  Signal level:0  Noise level:0
              Rx invalid nwid:0  Rx invalid crypt:0  Rx invalid frag:0
              Tx excessive retries:0  Invalid misc:0   Missed beacon:0
    I'm thinking that under
    Code:
    sudo lshw
    
    configuration: driver=ndiswrapper
    might be the problem. Shouldn't it say driver=prisma02 ?

    If so, how do I change that? I already tried "sudo ndiswrapper -d 2001:3701 prisma02"

  2. #2
    Linux Guru antidrugue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RapidFireGT
    Shouldn't it say driver=prisma02 ?
    No, it shouldn't. That's normal.

    Quote Originally Posted by RapidFireGT
    If so, how do I change that? I already tried "sudo ndiswrapper -d 2001:3701 prisma02"
    It seems that your driver is installed fine. You should just connect now. Either use network-manager or any other application to connect.
    "To express yourself in freedom, you must die to everything of yesterday. From the 'old', you derive security; from the 'new', you gain the flow."

    -Bruce Lee

  3. #3
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    Alright, well I'm still very new to linux, and not good with installing.

    I tried following the install instructions with Network-Manager, but they didn't work.

    1. `cd' to the directory containing the package's source code and type
    `./configure' to configure the package for your system. If you're
    using `csh' on an old version of System V, you might need to type
    `sh ./configure' instead to prevent `csh' from trying to execute
    `configure' itself.

    Running `configure' takes awhile. While running, it prints some
    messages telling which features it is checking for.

    2. Type `make' to compile the package.

    3. Optionally, type `make check' to run any self-tests that come with
    the package.

    4. Type `make install' to install the programs and any data files and
    documentation.

    5. You can remove the program binaries and object files from the
    source code directory by typing `make clean'. To also remove the
    files that `configure' created (so you can compile the package for
    a different kind of computer), type `make distclean'. There is
    also a `make maintainer-clean' target, but that is intended mainly
    for the package's developers. If you use it, you may have to get
    all sorts of other programs in order to regenerate files that came
    with the distribution.

    So I started with the first step, "./configure"
    Code:
    checking for a BSD-compatible install... /usr/bin/install -c
    checking whether build environment is sane... yes
    checking for gawk... no
    checking for mawk... mawk
    checking whether make sets $(MAKE)... yes
    checking whether to enable maintainer-specific portions of Makefiles... no
    checking for gcc... gcc
    checking for C compiler default output file name... a.out
    checking whether the C compiler works... yes
    checking whether we are cross compiling... no
    checking for suffix of executables...
    checking for suffix of object files... o
    checking whether we are using the GNU C compiler... yes
    checking whether gcc accepts -g... yes
    checking for gcc option to accept ISO C89... none needed
    checking for style of include used by make... GNU
    checking dependency style of gcc... gcc3
    checking whether gcc and cc understand -c and -o together... yes
    checking for a BSD-compatible install... /usr/bin/install -c
    checking build system type... i686-pc-linux-gnu
    checking host system type... i686-pc-linux-gnu
    checking for a sed that does not truncate output... /bin/sed
    checking for grep that handles long lines and -e... /bin/grep
    checking for egrep... /bin/grep -E
    checking for ld used by gcc... /usr/bin/ld
    checking if the linker (/usr/bin/ld) is GNU ld... yes
    checking for /usr/bin/ld option to reload object files... -r
    checking for BSD-compatible nm... /usr/bin/nm -B
    checking whether ln -s works... yes
    checking how to recognise dependent libraries... pass_all
    checking how to run the C preprocessor... gcc -E
    checking for ANSI C header files... yes
    checking for sys/types.h... yes
    checking for sys/stat.h... yes
    checking for stdlib.h... yes
    checking for string.h... yes
    checking for memory.h... yes
    checking for strings.h... yes
    checking for inttypes.h... yes
    checking for stdint.h... yes
    checking for unistd.h... yes
    checking dlfcn.h usability... yes
    checking dlfcn.h presence... yes
    checking for dlfcn.h... yes
    checking for g++... g++
    checking whether we are using the GNU C++ compiler... yes
    checking whether g++ accepts -g... yes
    checking dependency style of g++... gcc3
    checking how to run the C++ preprocessor... g++ -E
    checking for g77... no
    checking for f77... no
    checking for xlf... no
    checking for frt... no
    checking for pgf77... no
    checking for cf77... no
    checking for fort77... no
    checking for fl32... no
    checking for af77... no
    checking for f90... no
    checking for xlf90... no
    checking for pgf90... no
    checking for pghpf... no
    checking for epcf90... no
    checking for gfortran... no
    checking for g95... no
    checking for f95... no
    checking for fort... no
    checking for xlf95... no
    checking for ifort... no
    checking for ifc... no
    checking for efc... no
    checking for pgf95... no
    checking for lf95... no
    checking for ftn... no
    checking whether we are using the GNU Fortran 77 compiler... no
    checking whether  accepts -g... no
    checking the maximum length of command line arguments... 32768
    checking command to parse /usr/bin/nm -B output from gcc object... ok
    checking for objdir... .libs
    checking for ar... ar
    checking for ranlib... ranlib
    checking for strip... strip
    checking if gcc supports -fno-rtti -fno-exceptions... no
    checking for gcc option to produce PIC... -fPIC
    checking if gcc PIC flag -fPIC works... yes
    checking if gcc static flag -static works... yes
    checking if gcc supports -c -o file.o... yes
    checking whether the gcc linker (/usr/bin/ld) supports shared libraries... yes
    checking whether -lc should be explicitly linked in... no
    checking dynamic linker characteristics... GNU/Linux ld.so
    checking how to hardcode library paths into programs... immediate
    checking whether stripping libraries is possible... yes
    checking if libtool supports shared libraries... yes
    checking whether to build shared libraries... yes
    checking whether to build static libraries... yes
    configure: creating libtool
    appending configuration tag "CXX" to libtool
    checking for ld used by g++... /usr/bin/ld
    checking if the linker (/usr/bin/ld) is GNU ld... yes
    checking whether the g++ linker (/usr/bin/ld) supports shared libraries... yes
    checking for g++ option to produce PIC... -fPIC
    checking if g++ PIC flag -fPIC works... yes
    checking if g++ static flag -static works... yes
    checking if g++ supports -c -o file.o... yes
    checking whether the g++ linker (/usr/bin/ld) supports shared libraries... yes
    checking dynamic linker characteristics... GNU/Linux ld.so
    checking how to hardcode library paths into programs... immediate
    appending configuration tag "F77" to libtool
    checking for ANSI C header files... (cached) yes
    checking fcntl.h usability... yes
    checking fcntl.h presence... yes
    checking for fcntl.h... yes
    checking paths.h usability... yes
    checking paths.h presence... yes
    checking for paths.h... yes
    checking sys/ioctl.h usability... yes
    checking sys/ioctl.h presence... yes
    checking for sys/ioctl.h... yes
    checking sys/time.h usability... yes
    checking sys/time.h presence... yes
    checking for sys/time.h... yes
    checking syslog.h usability... yes
    checking syslog.h presence... yes
    checking for syslog.h... yes
    checking for unistd.h... (cached) yes
    checking for mode_t... yes
    checking for pid_t... yes
    checking whether time.h and sys/time.h may both be included... yes
    checking whether gcc needs -traditional... no
    checking for working memcmp... yes
    checking for select... yes
    checking for socket... yes
    checking for uname... yes
    checking for intltool >= 0.27.2... 0.34.1 found
    checking for perl... /usr/bin/perl
    checking for XML::Parser... configure: error: XML::Parser perl module is require d for intltool
    Then I tried the "make" command, and I got
    Code:
    make: *** No targets specified and no makefile found.  Stop.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru antidrugue's Avatar
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    Forget about compiling programs. With Ubuntu, you will probably never need to do that. The Ubuntu repository is huge and contains everything you'll ever need.

    You can use Synaptic to configure the repositories (in settings, enable universe and multiverse).

    After your repositories are properly configured, you can install network-manager-gnome using Synaptic.
    "To express yourself in freedom, you must die to everything of yesterday. From the 'old', you derive security; from the 'new', you gain the flow."

    -Bruce Lee

  5. #5
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    In Synaptic it says that networkmanager-0.6.4 is installed.

    However, I'm still really new to Linux and can't figure out how to run the program since apparently its already installed.

  6. #6
    Linux Guru antidrugue's Avatar
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    If you log out, and log back in, it will run automatically on startup.

    Make sure you have network-manager-gnome installed and not just network-manager (even if you are on Xubuntu).
    "To express yourself in freedom, you must die to everything of yesterday. From the 'old', you derive security; from the 'new', you gain the flow."

    -Bruce Lee

  7. #7
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    Synaptic only shows networkmanager-0.6.4 as being installed.

    There isn't even a network-manager-gnome package in the list. I had downloaded networkmanager 0.6.4 from GNOME.org
    and installed it.

    I also don't see any signs of a networkmanager running (after I logged out and logged back in)

    *EDIT* In Synaptic, networkmanager-0.6.4 is also under the section Installed (local or absolete)

    Also, when I go to Synaptic > Settings > Repositories > Add, I check-mark universe and multiverse, but after I click "Add", it doesn't save my changes.

  8. #8
    Linux Guru antidrugue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RapidFireGT
    There isn't even a network-manager-gnome package in the list. I had downloaded networkmanager 0.6.4 from GNOME.org
    and installed it.
    As my mentioned before, you should use Ubuntu package manager instead of any other method. By not using exclusively Synaptic (or apt-get or aptitude) you run the risk of breaking your system.

    Quote Originally Posted by RapidFireGT
    Also, when I go to Synaptic > Settings > Repositories > Add, I check-mark universe and multiverse, but after I click "Add", it doesn't save my changes.
    If that doesn't work, then you can edit the file manualy. The important file here is /etc/apt/sources.list. Make sure it looks something like that :
    http://antidrugue.dyndns.org/tprzepiorka/sources.list
    "To express yourself in freedom, you must die to everything of yesterday. From the 'old', you derive security; from the 'new', you gain the flow."

    -Bruce Lee

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